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Thread: 12G Long Rhizome Tank

  1. #1

    Default 12G Long Rhizome Tank

    Nothing but rhizome plants in here. Houses Least Killifish and cull shrimp from my other shrimp tanks. Using a Beamswork FSPEC for lighting.IMG_3619.jpg
    IMG_3613.jpgIMG_3614.jpgIMG_3615.jpgIMG_3616.jpg


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  2. #2

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    Looks really good!
    75 Gallon High-Tech Planted (Build Stage)


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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by snow999ball View Post
    Looks really good!
    Thank you!!



  4. #4

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    Nice, really like the buce collection


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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oliphant View Post
    Nice, really like the buce collection
    thank you. I bought it as a mixed basket from an importer of it and have no idea on the names of any of it. Most of it looks the same to me anyways.



  6. #6
    Fahaka Puffer Michael's Avatar
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    Great looking tank, it really shows the versatility of rhizome plants. I once saw a tank that had a large piece of wood with a whole garden of epiphytes on it and no other plants. It was one of the easiest planted tanks to care for--if the owner needed to trim or vacuum the gravel, he just lifted the wood out and put it in a tub.


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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Great looking tank, it really shows the versatility of rhizome plants. I once saw a tank that had a large piece of wood with a whole garden of epiphytes on it and no other plants. It was one of the easiest planted tanks to care for--if the owner needed to trim or vacuum the gravel, he just lifted the wood out and put it in a tub.
    What epiphytes in particular? I wasnt familiar with that group of plants and had to google it and it defined them as, "a plant that grows on another plant but is not parasitic, such as the numerous ferns, bromeliads, air plants, and orchids growing on tree trunks in tropical rainforests." The Least Killi's are really dirty fish so there is a good amount of mulm and fish waste in between the lava rocks.



  8. #8
    Fahaka Puffer Michael's Avatar
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    In planted tank jargon, "epiphyte" refers to plants like anubias, Java fern, bucephalandra, bolbitis fern, and mosses that grow attached to solid objects (wood, stone) and do not like to be planted in the substrate. It's a loose category, and some plants are in a gray area. For example, anubias will grow on stones or wood, and might send roots down into the substrate. Or it can grow along the surface of the substrate as long as the rhizome is not buried.

    Sorry for the confusion.


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  9. #9

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    No worries just havent heard the term used in the planted tank world. Have always had them referred to as rhizome plants.



  10. #10
    Fahaka Puffer Michael's Avatar
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    There is overlap between the two categories. For example, hydrocoytle and ranunculus are rhizome plants, but do not grow attached to objects.


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