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Thread: This Forum Is Dead So.... Im here for an Ask Me Anything

  1. #1

    Default This Forum Is Dead So.... Im here for an Ask Me Anything

    I've been keeping salt tanks for about 20 years, 4 of which were running an aquarium maintenance company. If you have any questions about anything salt related, lmk. If I can answer, I will. If I know, I'll tell you. If I dont, I'll tell you I don't know or don't have any experience with whatever it is. I've kept, and had customers keep, just about everything this side of jellyfish. But, since this group is so quiet, I wanted to, at least, offer some of my knowledge to anyone that might happen to have a question/s.

    Be well, J



  2. #2

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    Hello! Thanks for offerings and adding some content! I have a good amount of freshwater experience, mostly with African Cichlids but I've never done saltwater. I recently acquired (for free) a 60 gallon lobster tank. Complete with chiller, and I assume all other equipment usually involved. It is an older unit. very similar to this:

    https://www.ebay.com/p/Marineland-Ml...d=302565245283

    Except black and better looking.

    My question is, what would this tank be feasible for in regards to saltwater. I know I will need lighting but I don't know what else to expect...

    Very vague request but any advise would be appreciated.



  3. #3
    Just a long for the ride biggin's Avatar
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    I am curious, for a group outside the FB world.. what is dead?
    "I'm sick of following my dreams. I'm just going to ask them where they're going and hook up with them later. " - Mitch Hedberg

    “If you were supposed to watch your mouth all the time I doubt your eyes would be above it.” – Anonymous


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by biggin View Post
    I am curious, for a group outside the FB world.. what is dead?
    I agree for a local forum we do pretty well

    maybe he means the salty side since most of us are freshwater
    Plecos are like Pokemon you gotta catch them all!!!!!!!


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  5. #5
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    My wife and I are in the process of getting a frag tank started. No water running yet, but will be in the next few weeks to start it cycling.

    Do you have any advice on starting out for corals? Any major pitfalls that jump out at you from your experience?

    I recently purchased one of the Evo 15 gallon all-in-one tanks to have a small salt tank going in our apartment as well. That's on the backburner presently, but I hope to have that one up and running in April. Have you tried any nano tanks for saltwater?
    Steven // Life is too short to not pull up a chair and enjoy your tanks.



  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by biggin View Post
    I am curious, for a group outside the FB world.. what is dead?
    For a local forum we do great. I think he is comparing us to the national type forums. Glad that is not us...too much drama.


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dpalm View Post
    Hello! Thanks for offerings and adding some content! I have a good amount of freshwater experience, mostly with African Cichlids but I've never done saltwater. I recently acquired (for free) a 60 gallon lobster tank. Complete with chiller, and I assume all other equipment usually involved. It is an older unit. very similar to this:

    https://www.ebay.com/p/Marineland-Ml...d=302565245283

    Except black and better looking.

    My question is, what would this tank be feasible for in regards to saltwater. I know I will need lighting but I don't know what else to expect...

    Very vague request but any advise would be appreciated.
    Size and space are just fine for saltwater. The only thing you have to beware of when converting a tank, whether freshwater or salt is: was copper ever used to medicate fish in the tank. You will probably want invertibrates and possibly coral, at some point, and they will not tolerate the copper that is leaching out of the tank/seams. The same is true when considering switching from a fish only saltwater to a saltwater reef. This, presumably, being a lobster tank, it is unlikely they used copper to treat the crustaceans as that would be foolish. The chiller is probably not something you want to use. Generally, the chillers on lobster tanks are for Coldwater. I can't think of anything you'd want to keep in cold water. Typical hobby chillers attempt to keep the water between 76-80*f. If that chiller is adjustable to that level if could be useful if you have a hot light like metal halides.

    As you mentioned, you'll need lighting. The type/intensity depends entirely on what you want to keep. You'll need a skimmer, a heater, circulation pumps....and live rock. To be clear, you don't NEED a skimmrr. People run skimmer-less tanks but, it's much harder to get the tank to maturity(2 yrs or so) without catastrophic failure/s without a skimmer than with. I can't say what sort of plumbing situation that thing has (we never serviced as lobster tanks) but, if it's pluming allows for a sump, that's great. You can put the skimmer and heater (and a fuge, see below) in the sump. If it doesn't allow for a sump and you don't want to drill it, you can get a hang on back skimmer. There are less options for HOB skimmers but, they work just fine. There are 2 downsides 1) the pump & output are in the display(not a big deal) 2) they efficacy of the skimmer is always(no matter if it's HOB or internal) tied to the water level. You have to dial the skimmer in, adjusting it's internal water level, adjusting the height of the skimmer vs surrounding water level, and, on some, adjusting the air intake of the pump. When 1 variable changes, it throws the whole system off. You may see where I'm going.... well, without a sump, the water level in the display is constantly changing, adding a variable. So, you MUST have an ATO (auto top off) with a hang on back skimmer or it'll skim very poorly and irradically.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by biggin View Post
    I am curious, for a group outside the FB world.. what is dead?
    Not having a reply in 6 months, obviously, qualified as dead to me.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFredPit View Post
    I agree for a local forum we do pretty well

    maybe he means the salty side since most of us are freshwater
    Yes, I was referring to the saltwater forum, and this sub forum in particular.
    Last edited by Reesetricted; 02-22-2018 at 12:04 PM.



  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by prahsms View Post
    My wife and I are in the process of getting a frag tank started. No water running yet, but will be in the next few weeks to start it cycling.

    Do you have any advice on starting out for corals? Any major pitfalls that jump out at you from your experience?

    I recently purchased one of the Evo 15 gallon all-in-one tanks to have a small salt tank going in our apartment as well. That's on the backburner presently, but I hope to have that one up and running in April. Have you tried any nano tanks for saltwater?
    I have a ton of experience with nanos. As you've probably read, the smaller the water volume, the more rapidly things change. You want as much stability as possibly, and for changes to happen gradually. Nothing good ever happens quickly. Someone once said "I've never seen a colony grow overnight but, I've certainly seen one die overnight." With a nano this is especially true so, my recommendation is to take as many precautions as possible to maintain predictability. Use an ATO top off(diy $10)and an auto doser(jebao $64). Maintaining stable salinity, calcium, alkalinity, magnesium, and ph are all essential to the success of keeping corals. The common ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, phosphates are afterthoughts when trying to keep more difficult corals.

    Personally, I advocate against water changes. It is a poor method of nutrient export and a quick change to water parameters. Instead, I recommend a well lit, good sized refugium or carbon dosing. Either will bring nitrates and phosphates to (or near) undetectable levels. I'd recommend a tank start process of:

    *Tank with water, rock, and circulation but, no light. If you have access to coraline, crumble some into the tank and add "bio digest" or a similar product- run like this for 2 weeks
    *fire up the refugium with chaetomorpha, running the fuge light 24/7 (at least a 100w equivalent CFL, if not an LED (RED/BLUE) grow light) and put in something to rot in the display tank (EG, daily fish food, 1 whole shrimp, etc)-another 2 weeks.
    *now the chaeto should be growing, the rock should have a nice film(that should help protect from nuisance algaes), the coraline will have had a chance to establish a foothold, and the ammonia and nitrite should be at zero. Nitrates and phosphates should be at or verrry close to zero. If not, continue for another week and test again. If all zero, turn on the lights and continue feeding or drop in another shrimp (frozen or fresh, doesn't matter)or.... add a fish. Again, zeros across the board. At this point you've established the necessary bacteria but, not a ton of it. So, you can't add a bunch of fish. Add 1 or 2 at a time at 2 week intervals.
    *assuming you're about the 6 week mark, you're reading zeros across the board(with or without fish), you're chaeto is growing (remove chunks of it and give it away, you want it to have room to tumble and grow. You're physically removing nutrient from your system), and the tank is showing minimal algae/diatom/cyano bacteria growth, you can try out a soft coral or 2.

    If you follow that tank start up procedure, you'll avoid sooooo much hassle with all the brown, green, and red "algae" outbreaks. Youll still have some hiccups, probably, but, that will put you on a path to success....and not a headache with an accompanying money pit.

    As a little aside, you can dose, probably, 15 or 20 different products. I DIY dose [ALK]washing soda/sodium carbonate (baked baking soda, actually), [CALC]Damp Rid/calcium chloride, [MAG]Epsom salts/magnesium sulphate, [CARB]5% distilled white vinegar/acetic acid. Bc I use magnesium sulfate, I have to do a water change every 6 months or so due to a build up of sulfates in the water(there are no noticable effects but, it is known so, I do it as a preventive measure). If I used magnesium chloride/Ice Melt, I wouldn't have to do water changes at all. The issue isn't that ice melt in texas is rare and I 1) can't find a reliable source for them 2) can't find any of the brands that are known to be pure enough for reefs. I like to do a water change to replenish a bit of the trace elements anyway. I like that i can go to wlamrt 24hrs a day and buy any of these products. There is a lot to be said for accessibility. These recipes can easily be found online but, if you'd like, I can post my procedures for reference.
    Last edited by Reesetricted; 02-22-2018 at 12:09 PM.



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