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Thread: Summer Tubs

  1. #11
    Site Supporter Site Supporter carddude123's Avatar
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    Water totes don't conduct heat or cold so the water stays more constant than acrylic and some glass tanks.

    Having said that there are some Africans that need either to be inside or have a chiller. IMO Trooheus don't adjust well to changes in water temp, but most are ok.
    All About African Cichlids (Facebook page & group, Instagram and Gmail account). Masoni, Turkis, Lemon Jake, Red Kaiser, Lwanda, Bi-Colors, Germ Red, Pheno Star Sapphires, Zrock Lithobates, Mdoka White Lips, Xyistromis Flamebacks, Gold Kawanga OB, Pundimilia Mwanza Gulf a d way too many more.



  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by carddude123 View Post
    Water totes don't conduct heat or cold so the water stays more constant than acrylic and some glass tanks.
    Those black rubbermaid tubs do. They get noticeably warmer(water in them) than a kiddie pool does.



  3. #13

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    What species would y'all recommend for the summer tubs? Thinking of doing the basic guppies, maybe goldfish to try my luck with that, and then maybe yellow labs or convicts just to be easy summer tub fish
    55 gallon, 29 Planted breeder tank, 40 Gallon Split Haitiensis grow out/Shell dweller tank



  4. #14
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    Maybe a dumb question - how do y'all power outdoor tubs? I'd love to do a patio tub / 'planter pond' on my apartment porch, but don't have an outlet available to power a pump or filter.

    Has anyone messed around with small solar panels for outdoor ponds or tubs? (asking prematurely... I need to finish other projects before I start my research)
    Steven // Life is too short to not pull up a chair and enjoy your tanks.



  5. #15
    Fahaka Puffer Michael's Avatar
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    Most of my tubs are not "powered" at all. The large ponds have recirculating pumps plugged into GFI receptacles, but the small ones don't. There are solar powered pumps and fountains. The big problem with these is that they don't work at night (at least the ones I've seen), and that is when the oxygen levels drop because photosynthesis and oxygen production from plants stops. Battery powered aerators are a possible solution, if the batteries are rechargeable.


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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael View Post
    Most of my tubs are not "powered" at all. The large ponds have recirculating pumps plugged into GFI receptacles, but the small ones don't. There are solar powered pumps and fountains. The big problem with these is that they don't work at night (at least the ones I've seen), and that is when the oxygen levels drop because photosynthesis and oxygen production from plants stops. Battery powered aerators are a possible solution, if the batteries are rechargeable.
    Interesting.. thanks Michael! It looks like I still need to chew on this one.

    For your smaller tubs, do you go with a Walstad kind of set up? Sorry to pick your brain, I'm hoping I can emulate your processes. I remember at an APC meeting a couple years ago you had a lot of awesome setups!
    Steven // Life is too short to not pull up a chair and enjoy your tanks.



  7. #17
    Fahaka Puffer Michael's Avatar
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    Thanks!

    I don't cover the entire bottom of the tub with soil and gravel cap as you would in a Walstad aquarium. I like to be able to move the plants around as they grow, and tear the whole tub down easily if there is a problem. So I use trays and shallow pots with soil and cap, aiming for the same depth of substrate as you would have in a large aquarium. Size of the tray or pot varies with what species of plant that will be grown in them. Water lilies get much bigger and deeper pots than more typical aquarium species. It is hard to work with any container that is not at least 2" deep. The tray/pots do not need drain holes, and if they do have drain holes you need to cover the hole so that the soil does not escape. The plastic mesh aquatic plant pots sold at water gardening places work well, but are pricey and not really necessary.



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